National Sports Headlines from NBC Sports

Yankees place 1B Mark Teixeira on 15-day DL

TORONTO (AP) The New York Yankees have placed first baseman Mark Teixeira on the 15-day disabled list with a strained right hamstring and recalled catcher Austin Romine from Triple-A Scranton.

Teixeira left Friday's game in the second inning after he was injured while trying to field a foul grounder. Kelly Johnson moved from second base to first and Brian Roberts came in to play second.

Manager Joe Girardi says Teixeira will undergo an MRI exam when the Yankees return home Monday.

Johnson started at first base Saturday, and Girardi says Johnson will get the bulk of the playing time in Teixeira's absence. Dean Anna, Francisco Cervelli and Yangervis Solarte could also see time at first.

Teixeira was limited to 15 games last season after hurting his right wrist at the World Baseball Classic.

Wolves win wild double-OT affair in Miami

MIAMI (AP) Corey Brewer hit one of two free throws with 1.8 seconds left in the second overtime, and the Minnesota Timberwolves beat the Miami Heat 122-121 on Friday night.

Kevin Love scored 28 points and grabbed 11 rebounds for Minnesota, which got 24 from Chase Budinger, 15 from Gorgui Dieng and 13 apiece from JJ Barea and Ricky Rubio, who also added 14 assists. Referee Ken Mauer called the last foul on Miami's Norris Cole, saying he hit Brewer on a pass into the paint.

Ray Allen missed a wild jumper as time expired for Miami, which blew a chance to move two games clear of Indiana in the loss column atop the Eastern Conference standings.

LeBron James scored 34 points for the Heat, who got a season-high 24 from Mario Chalmers and 24 more from Chris Bosh, including a tying 3-pointer with 10.8 seconds left in the second overtime.

But Brewer got the call on the next Minnesota possession, and his free throw was the difference.

Miami went 24 for 30 from the line, but three of those six misses were costly. James missed one of two free throws with 16.2 seconds to go, and Chalmers missed the first of two on his trips to the line in the final seconds of both regulation and the first overtime.

The Heat (52-23, .693) remained percentage points ahead of Indiana (53-24, .688), which lost earlier Friday night at Toronto, 102-94.

Regulation and the first overtime ended in virtually the same fashion. With Minnesota up by one and Miami in desperation mode, Chalmers would make the second of two free throws - with 3.9 seconds left in the fourth, then with 1.9 seconds left in the first extra session - to tie the game, followed by the Heat watching a potential winning jumper by Love bounce off the rim.

There were nine lead changes in the entirety of regulation. There were 10 in the first OT alone.

Budinger's fifth 3-pointer of the night put Minnesota up 107-106 late in the first extra period. Bosh fought for an offensive rebound on the next Miami possession, wound up getting fouled and coolly making a pair of free throws to give the Heat a one-point edge.

Minnesota called its next play for Love, who backed Bosh down and connected on a jump hook to reclaim that one-point lead. But Chalmers wound up drawing another foul, hit the second shot and off to double-overtime they went.

By then, it was obvious that whichever team lost was going to have a long night of lamenting missed opportunities.

Minnesota had a six-point lead early in the fourth, but a pair of 3s on consecutive possessions by Allen - who returned from a five-game absence brought on by a nasty bout with the flu - tied the game at 82-all.

That's when James went to the bench for a quick breather. When he returned, the Heat were down by five, and Minnesota's lead was seven with 3 minutes left in regulation.

Bosh wasn't deterred. He made a pair of free throws, had a key block and hit a 3-pointer to get the Heat within 93-91 with 1:58 left. Chalmers scored four of Miami's final six points of regulation, and Love had a stepback 3-pointer rim out as regulation time expired.

For a team not going to the playoffs, Minnesota had plenty of poise.

James made a jumper over Brewer to get Miami within 60-56 early in the third. But by the time that basket was even announced, the Timberwolves answered with one of their best weapons - the fabled Love outlet pass. Love grabbed the ball as James' jumper fell through the net, then quickly fired about an 80-foot pass to a breaking Brewer for a dunk that restored Minnesota's six-point lead.

Minnesota led by nine later in the third before James scored Miami's last 12 points of the period.

NOTES: Miami was again without Dwyane Wade (hamstring) and Greg Oden (back spasms). ... It was Rubio's first time playing at Miami. ... Minnesota was again without C Nikola Pekovic (ankle), who has missed 21 of the Timberwolves' last 31 games. ... A foul by Budinger saved Minnesota two points late in the third; he hit James on a play where Allen made a 3-pointer. After review, Allen's 3 was correctly taken off the board and James only made one of his two ensuing free throws.

Harden's 39 lead Rockets over Thunder 111-107

HOUSTON (AP) James Harden scored 39 points and the Houston Rockets ended a three-game skid and clinched their second straight playoff berth with a 111-107 victory over the Oklahoma City Thunder on Friday night.

Kevin Durant scored 28 points and grabbed 12 rebounds for his 40th straight game with at least 25 points, the longest streak since Michael Jordan also did it 40 consecutive times in 1986-87.

Durant's 3-pointer cut Houston's lead to one with 1:01 remaining, but Houston answered with four straight free throws. He made another 3 with 16 seconds left, but Harden made two free throws to push the lead to 111-107.

Harden was 17 of 20 from the line and had nine rebounds and seven assists.

The Rockets were playing without Dwight Howard and Patrick Beverley, who both missed their fourth straight games. Howard has missed seven games recently because of a left ankle strain and Beverley is out indefinitely with a torn meniscus in his right knee.

Serge Ibaka tied a career high with 27 points in a game that Russell Westbrook didn't play because the Thunder were playing the second night of a back-to-back.

Chandler Parsons added 23 points for Houston and Terrence Jones had 16 points and 11 rebounds.

Oklahoma City was up by one before Houston scored seven straight points to take a 104-98 lead with less than three minutes left. The Rockets made four free throws before a 3-pointer by Francisco Garcia.

The Rockets started the fourth quarter with 3-pointers by Jeremy Lin, Isaiah Canaan and Harden for a 9-2 spurt which gave them a 91-86 lead with about 10 minutes left. Durant scored the next four points to get Oklahoma City within 91-90.

The Rockets got within two on a layup by Omer Asik. Oklahoma City then used an 11-5 run, with two 3s by Caron Butler, to push its lead to 84-76 with two minutes left in the third quarter.

Houston scored the last six points of the third quarter to cut the lead to 84-82 entering the fourth quarter.

The Thunder scored 39 points in the third quarter to take the lead after trailing the entire game. They opened the second half with a 9-0 run punctuated by a dunk by Ibaka to make it 54-52. Houston went right back on top with a 3-pointer by Parsons, but a 9-2 spurt by the Thunder gave them a 63-57 lead with about seven minutes left in the quarter.

Houston built a 14-4 lead early and was up 27-23 at the end of the first quarter.

The Thunder cut it to three points early in the second quarter on a 3-pointer by Butler before an 11-0 run by Houston pushed the lead to 43-29 about five minutes before halftime. Harden scored the last seven points in that span and capped it by making a 3-pointer with Derek Fisher right in his face.

Durant scored Oklahoma City's final five points to get the Thunder within 50-45 at halftime. The first three points of that run came when Durant was fouled on an off-balance layup he made with his back to the basket and then made the free throw.

NOTES: The 39 points the Thunder scored in the third quarter were the most anyone has scored against Houston this season in the quarter. ... Hall of Famer Hakeem Olajuwon watched the game from a courtside seat.

Mariners-A's postponed because of soggy field

OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) The game between the Seattle Mariners and Oakland Athletics was called off Friday night because of a water-logged field that both teams and the umpiring crew said made conditions dangerous.

David Rinetti, A's vice president of stadium operations, says the tarp was kept off the field in an effort to let it dry overnight but an unexpected downpour caused further problems and the grounds crew worked tirelessly on the infield dirt from 7 a.m. until the game was called about the time of scheduled first pitch at 7:05 p.m. A delay had previously been announced.

The A's used a weather consultant to help make decisions about the tarp.

Players on both sides decided to play one game Saturday afternoon rather than a split doubleheader, which will be played later.

Tanaka wins debut, Yankees beat Blue Jays 7-3

TORONTO (AP) Masahiro Tanaka pitched seven innings to win his major league debut, Jacoby Ellsbury had three hits and the New York Yankees beat the Toronto Blue Jays 7-3 on Friday night.

Staked to a 2-0 lead before taking the mound, Tanaka (1-0) got a startling welcome to the major leagues when the Japanese right-hander surrendered a home run to Toronto's Melky Cabrera on his third pitch. It was Cabrera's first homer of the season and the second leadoff shot of his career.

Tanaka settled down to retire the next three batters, catching Jose Bautista looking at a curveball and getting Edwin Encarnacion to miss on a slider.

New York reclaimed the lead and chased Blue Jays starter Dustin McGowan (0-1) with a two-run third that was aided by an overturned call.

Chase Elliott grabs 1st career Nationwide victory

FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) Chase Elliott has grabbed his first career Nationwide Series victory, using a strong pass of Kevin Harvick and then pulling away for an easy win at Texas Motor Speedway.

The 18-year-old won in his sixth career start and became the fourth driver in Nationwide history to earn his first series victory at Texas.

The victory continues the youth initiative in NASCAR as first-time winners have now won consecutive races for the first time since 2008. Two weeks ago, 21-year-old Kyle Larson scored his first career win at California.

Elliott was strong Friday night but was second behind Harvick on the final restart with 23 laps to go. He flirted several times with making a pass for the win, and completed the move with an outside pass and never looked back.

Report: Broncos, Fox agree on 3-year deal

ENGLEWOOD, Colo. (AP) A person with knowledge of the deal tells The Associated Press that coach John Fox has agreed to a new three-year contract with the Denver Broncos.

The person, who spoke on condition of anonymity because the deal hasn't been announced, said the team ripped up Fox's 2014 contract and replaced it with a deal that runs through 2016.

GM John Elway said in early February that Fox would get a new deal this offseason.

Fox has gone 37-17 with three AFC West titles in his three seasons in Denver.

He overcame a heart operation in November to lead the Broncos to an appearance in the Super Bowl, where they lost 43-8 to Seattle.

Raptors upend Pacers 102-94

TORONTO (AP) Terrence Ross scored 24 points to lead the short-handed Toronto Raptors 102-94 over the Indiana Pacers on Friday.

Jonas Valanciunas added 22 points and nine rebounds, while DeMar DeRozan scored 20 for the Raptors, who earned their fifth win in six games despite missing starters Kyle Lowry and Amir Johnson.

Greivis Vasquez and Nando De Colo each had 10 points, while Patrick Patterson, who started in place of Johnson in only his third game since missing 11 with an elbow injury, had seven rebounds.

Paul George had 26 points to top the Pacers and David West added 21.

There was a postseason vibe to Friday's Eastern Conference matchup between two teams that could potentially meet in the second round of the playoffs.

Apologetic Puig misses Dodgers home opener

LOS ANGELES (AP) Yasiel Puig was scratched from the starting lineup after arriving late for the Los Angeles Dodgers' home opener on Friday.

The rest of the team was already on the field stretching before batting practice while Puig was getting dressed in the clubhouse. He had been slated to start in right field for the afternoon game against the San Francisco Giants, who beat the Dodgers 8-4.

"I'm sincerely sorry," Puig said through a translator after the game, explaining that he didn't realize stretching and batting practice would be held so early with a 1 p.m. start.

Puig said he apologized to manager Don Mattingly and his teammates, and they accepted.

"They felt it was OK when I owned up to it and apologized," he said. "I felt bad I wasn't out there playing for all the fans."

Instead, Matt Kemp replaced Puig in the lineup after manager Don Mattingly had earlier said Kemp wouldn't start. Kemp came off the disabled list on Friday after rehabilitating from left ankle and shoulder operations. He was limited to 279 games during the last two seasons because of injuries.

Puig, last year's runner-up for NL Rookie of the Year, was 5 for 20 through his first five games of the season. He wasn't used as a pinch-hitter because Mattingly said the situation didn't call for it. The Dodgers trailed 8-0 after two innings.

Mattingly downplayed Puig's mistake.

"He truly felt bad," the manager said. "You can tell by his body language; he doesn't hide things well."

Mattingly said he thought not allowing Puig to play was more fitting punishment than fining him a couple hundred dollars.

"He felt bad he wasn't here and I believe that," Mattingly said. "He's a good kid. Does he have to grow up and get better? Yeah, but there's a lot of guys like that."

It was the latest in a series of frustrations for the team involving Puig.

Last week, Mattingly called a team meeting after the 23-year-old Cuban defector made two mistakes on the basepaths during the Dodgers opening two-game trip to Australia.

The dynamic right fielder became an instant sensation last year when he made his big league debut in early June and helped lead the Dodgers from last to the NL West title. But Mattingly often was frustrated by Puig's decision-making in the field and on the bases.

Puig twice was arrested for reckless driving last year, when his effort on the field also came into question at times. He went 5 for 22 (.227) with 10 strikeouts and committed defensive miscues against St. Louis in the NL championship series.

He remains a fan favorite, but the Dodgers want to see Puig grow up, be consistent and show better judgment on and off the field.

Catcher A.J. Ellis chalked Puig's mistake up to something that can happen to any player in the mix of day and night games.

"It's one of these learning experiences," Ellis said. "He's going to be fine. I'm sure he'll be very prompt and on time for the rest of his career, hopefully."

Saturday's game against the Giants also starts at 1 p.m.

"I'll be here early," Puig said.

Florida St faces investigation after Winston case

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) A federal query into whether Florida State University adequately investigated whether Heisman Trophy-winner Jameis Winston sexually assaulted another student could result in the school losing federal funding, but history suggests a settlement will be reached instead, officials said Friday.

The woman who accused the quarterback of raping her in 2012 filed a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education Office for Civil Rights, which decided the university should be investigated for possible Title IX violations over the way it responds to sexual violence complaints. After an investigation by Tallahassee police and prosecutors, officials announced in December that Winston would not be charged.

Title IX is a federal statute that bans discrimination at schools that receive federal funding. The department in 2011 warned schools of their legal responsibilities to immediately investigate allegations of sexual assault, even if the criminal investigation has not concluded. Winston's accuser said FSU did not do that.

Department of Education spokesman Jim Bradshaw said Friday it has been more than 10 years since a school has lost federal funding for failing to comply with Title IX or needed other enforcement measures. He said if a problem is found, an agreement is usually reached with the university to take measures to ensure compliance with legal standards and improve procedures.

He said there is no set format for a civil rights investigation and the scope varies depending on the circumstances. The investigation could look at multiple reports of sexual assault at a university to see how they were handled. The department normally requests copies of policies, procedures and other paperwork to review and also conducts in-person interviews.

Florida State officials have confirmed the federal investigation but have declined comment, citing federal and state privacy laws.

Erin Buzuvis, a professor at the Western New England University School of Law who specializes in Title IX, said the threat of losing federal funding is what forces schools to comply.

Last year, the State University of New York agreed to several guidelines, including having a Title IX coordinator at each of its 29 campuses and conducting sexual assault investigations promptly instead of waiting for the conclusion of a criminal investigation.

Also last year, the University of Montana in Missoula agreed to revise its policies, procedures and investigative practices. It is also agreed to a monitoring program in which it provides copies of annual assessments and other required documents. The agreement lasts three years.

Buzuvis said the Montana case is the blueprint for most agreements.

"It's not meant to be comfortable," Buzuvis said. "There's some level of intrusion that comes with having to venture into one of these agreements."

The woman who accused Winston told university police investigators she had been at a bar with friends, had several drinks and her memory of what happened next wasn't clear. She said she got into a cab with a man, went to his off-campus apartment and, over her objections, he had sex with her. She couldn't remember where the apartment was. The campus police turned the investigation over to the Tallahassee police.

A month later, the woman identified her alleged attacker as Winston. Her family accused Tallahassee detectives of delaying the investigation and discouraging her from going forward with the case because of the public attention it would receive at the university in the city.

The Associated Press generally does not identify those who say they were sexually assaulted.

The department has defended its handling of the case, but didn't turn its evidence over to Willie Meggs, the local state attorney, until mid-November, about the same time journalists began looking into rumors that Winston had been accused of rape.

On Dec. 5, Meggs announced that Winston would not be charged, saying he couldn't prove beyond a reasonable doubt the woman's allegations.

It is unclear if woman will pursue a civil case against Winston or the university. She can still sue after the investigation. Buzuvis said her case could be stronger depending on the Department of Education's findings.

Braun booed in first road game since suspension

BOSTON (AP) From the boos to the bad at-bats, Ryan Braun's first road game since his 65-game suspension was a rough afternoon.

He went 0 for 5 against the Red Sox on Friday. But he was 5 for 5 in getting hooted by Fenway Park's passionate fans.

"All I can do is focus on things I can control," Braun said after the Milwaukee Brewers spoiled Boston's home opener with a 6-2 win. "I certainly wasn't anticipating a reception like I got in Milwaukee."

In the season opener at home on Monday, fans applauded loudly as he walked to the plate against the Atlanta Braves. In Boston, the boos started even before the game as the 2011 NL MVP heard them when the starting lineup was announced and Milwaukee players lined up along the third-base line.

The Brewers slugger has apologized several times this offseason after accepting his suspension on July 22 following Major League Baseball's investigation of the Biogenesis of America anti-aging clinic. The penalty was given for violations of MLB's drug agreement and labor contract.

Braun was the designated hitter and hit in his customary No. 3 position against the Red Sox. He struck out, popped to second base, flied to right, grounded to shortstop and flied to right.

A victory "always makes it so much better," Braun said of his struggles. "I'm at a point in my career where I've had a lot of individual success, and the game is so much more fun when the team's winning."

Braun has been dealing with a nerve problem in the area of his right thumb.

"It's kind of ebb and flow, up and down," he said. "I hope we find something that eventually makes a difference."

That's just one more issue for Braun to deal with as he comes back from his suspension. But he's trying to ignore the boos from opposing fans.

"I've dealt with it for the last couple of years," he said, "so I've had plenty of experience dealing with it and I think regardless of how challenging anything is, the more you deal with it, the easier it becomes to deal with. I dealt with it in 2012, had my best year. Last year I was off to a good start before my early departure."

He knows there's not much he can do to stop fans from expressing themselves.

"I don't know if I was yelling at people if that would make any type of difference, and that's not who I am," Braun said. "There's no blueprint for any of this stuff. It's not easy. It's not fun, but I just deal with it the best I can."

Wolves' Cunningham accused of choking girlfriend

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) Minnesota Timberwolves forward Dante Cunningham was charged Friday with assault after being accused of choking his girlfriend during an argument.

A criminal complaint filed in Hennepin County District Court said his girlfriend told police they got into the argument early Thursday at his suburban Minneapolis home. The woman, who is not named in the complaint, told police he kicked down a locked bedroom door, grabbed her around the neck and slammed her against the wall, choking her for 15 to 20 seconds during which she could not breathe.

"Victim's eyes were watering and she felt like she was being strangled to death," the complaint alleges.

The woman told police he then dropped her, and she called 911.

According to the complaint, their relationship began last summer and they had been living together for eight months. Police said Thursday that she did not require medical treatment.

Cunningham was charged with one felony count of domestic assault by strangulation. The 26-year-old remained jailed Friday evening with bail set at $40,000. It wasn't clear if he had an attorney.

He was unable to join the Timberwolves when they left Thursday on a two-game road trip to Florida.

The team issued a statement Thursday saying they were gathering more information.

"The Minnesota Timberwolves organization takes the matter very seriously and does not condone the type of behavior that is associated with this situation," the statement read. "However, we need to let the legal process run its course, and will have further comment at the appropriate time."

Donovan, Calipari in bonus duel at Final Four

ARLINGTON, Texas (AP) Florida's Billy Donovan has both the SEC trophies from this season. Kentucky's John Calipari has the bigger bonus check, at least for now.

If the Gators get past Connecticut in Saturday's semifinals and win their third national championship under Donovan on Monday night, the coach will have the biggest postseason payoff among his Final Four counterparts.

If Calipari makes it two titles in the past three seasons with the Wildcats, he will take home $700,000 through incentives that are common for college coaches but more lucrative at some schools.

Kentucky is clearly on the higher end in basketball. Calipari can make as much as $800,000 each year off the success of his team - he's leaving at least $100,000 on the table this year because Florida won the SEC regular-season and tournament championships.

But even the $700,000 he could get this year is more than the combined maximum for the other three coaches with a shot at the title.

Donovan would make $400,000 with a championship, followed by Connecticut's Kevin Ollie at $166,666 and Wisconsin's Bo Ryan at $120,000.

"A program's got to reach a stage of saying, `Whatever decision we make, we're making it within our means,"' said Oklahoma athletic director Joe Castiglione, who has one of the nation's highest-paid football coaches in Bob Stoops. "I know people focus on some of these salaries and I understand that, but there's a lot more investment being made into areas that directly, hopefully positively, impact the experience for student-athletes."

Winning helps that experience as much as anything, and coaches usually have quite a bit extra spending money when they make long postseason runs.

Donovan, who recently signed a three-year extension that raised his average salary to $3.7 million annually over the final six years of the contract, has made an extra $250,000 so far this season. The 18th-year Florida coach would get another $150,000 by winning the title.

Calipari already has $350,000 coming his way - $100,000 each for reaching the Sweet 16 and the regional finals and another $150,000 for making the Final Four. A championship would mean another $350,000 for a coach who has a guaranteed income of $4.8 million this season.

"It seems like we're working to keep coaches and if there's a lack of success people are questioning about keeping coaches," Castiglione said. "So you're always balancing one or the other. When programs see success happening at others, they want to emulate it. Sometimes that means they're coming after your best personnel."

Connecticut athletic director Warde Manual is already on record as saying he wants to rework Ollie's contract after the Huskies made a surprising run to the Final Four.

Ollie and Ryan have bonus structures more closely tied to school formulas.

At UConn, Ollie and women's coach Geno Auriemma get $33,333 at three benchmarks - making the tournament, getting to the Sweet 16 and advancing to the Final Four. The payoff doubles for a championship.

Ollie is making $1.2 million this year, about $700,000 less than Auriemma in a rare instance of the coach of a women's team making more than the men's coach at the same school.

Ryan, whose is making about $2.3 million this season, has already earned $60,000 for reaching the Final Four. That bonus jumps to $100,000 with a trip to the title game and $120,000 if the Badgers win the school's second national title.

Saints agree to terms with Champ Bailey

NEW ORLEANS (AP) Champ Bailey will get to chase a Pro Bowl record and another Super Bowl appearance with the New Orleans Saints.

The veteran cornerback agreed to a two-year contract with the Saints on Friday, with a maximum value that approaches $7 million, including guaranteed money and a signing bonus in the first year.

The 35-year-old Bailey played the last 10 seasons with Denver after spending his first five in the NFL with Washington. A shutdown cornerback for much of his career, Bailey has made three All-Pro teams and been selected to 12 Pro Bowls. He trails only Hall of Fame end Reggie White (13) among defensive players in NFL history in Pro Bowls.

Bailey's 52 interceptions are the most among active players, as are his 204 passes defensed. He made the league's All-Decade team for 2000-09.

"We are excited to be able to add a future Hall of Fame player with the addition of Champ Bailey," Saints general manager Mickey Loomis said. "His career accomplishments mirror that of his high character, and he's a very prideful and competitive player who we believe will add to our defense."

Bailey missed 11 games because of a left foot sprain originally suffered in the 2013 preseason, which wound up being a Lisfranc injury, one of the most painful for an athlete.

He returned late in the season to help the Broncos advance to the Super Bowl, where they were routed by Seattle.

His coverage skills clearly are not what they were in his prime, but he will add leadership and savvy to the Saints' secondary that is undergoing a transformation following the release of strong safety Roman Harper and the loss of free safety Malcolm Jenkins, who signed with Philadelphia as a free agent.

"I have a little more to my game, I believe, especially mentally," Bailey said on the Saints' official website. "I can see things a lot easier, a lot of things come up that I've had experience with. That only helps your game. I'm using that to my advantage as much as possible because I know how much you've got to be mentally ready for this, as well as physically ready.

"I just like the situation I'm going into because I know these guys are going to be hungry."

New Orleans also may lose safety Rafael Bush, an unrestricted free agent who on Thursday signed an offer sheet from the Atlanta Falcons. New Orleans has until April 8 to match that offer and keep Bush, but the Saints have been operating with minimal salary cap space, which will only be squeezed further by bringing in Bailey.

A versatile player who saw action on offense, defense and special teams at Georgia, Bailey was drafted with the seventh overall pick in 1999 by Washington. He was dealt to Denver in 2004 for running back Clinton Portis.

Wake Forest hires Danny Manning from Tulsa

Danny Manning grew up watching Wake Forest play games at the Greensboro Coliseum, memories that linger in his mind all these years later.

He never thought one day he'd coach the Demon Deacons.

Manning, the former Kansas star who spent the past two seasons coaching Tulsa, was hired Friday as Wake Forest's basketball coach. He'll be introduced at a news conference next week on campus in Winston-Salem, N.C., a short drive from where Manning grew up.

"I spent a lot of my formative childhood years in North Carolina," Manning told The Associated Press on Friday at AT&T Stadium, the site of this weekend's Final Four.

"I spent the majority of my life in Kansas," Manning said, "but this was a chance to be a part of a university that I share the same values and history with."

His hiring ends Wake Forest's two-week search for a replacement for Jeff Bzdelik, who resigned under intense public pressure following four mostly unremarkable seasons.

Manning, who was 38-29 with two postseason berths in two seasons at Tulsa, interviewed this week and toured the campus in Winston-Salem on Wednesday before taking the job two days later.

His hiring is considered somewhat risky because of his lack of head coaching experience, but there's no question he brings instant name recognition to a program that dropped to near the bottom of the expanded Atlantic Coast Conference.

"There have been very few players who have had as much success on the court as Danny," Wake Forest athletic director Ron Wellman said in a statement. "He has played for and worked under a number of legendary coaches and he has been successful in his coaching career. We fully expect that Danny's coaching career will reflect the excellence of his playing career."

Manning attended Greensboro Page High School before his family moved to Lawrence, Kan., for his senior year, and when it was time to choose a college, he picked Kansas over North Carolina.

After his "Danny and the Miracles" team won the national title in Kansas City, not far from the Jayhawks' campus, Manning was drafted first overall by the Los Angeles Clippers in 1988.

He made two All-Star teams during a career marred by injuries before joining coach Bill Self's staff at Kansas in 2003. Responsible primarily for working with post players, Manning was promoted to assistant coach in 2006 and two years ago earned his first head coaching job at Tulsa.

Self called Manning "one of the most accomplished, humble people you'll ever meet."

The 47-year-old Manning took the Golden Hurricane to the CBI in his first year and followed that by guiding them to the Conference USA tournament title and their first NCAA tournament berth since 2003. They earned a No. 13 seed and lost to UCLA in their tournament opener.

Tulsa forward Rashad Smith said he found out about Manning's move through teammates and media reports, though he said the coach texted him shortly thereafter.

Guard James Woodard said it was "kind of shocking.

"You know in the back of your mind, the run we had this year, there would be a lot of opportunities out there," Woodard said. "I'm happy for him."

Wake Forest never came close to making the NCAA tournament under Bzdelik, who stepped down March 20. Bzdelik went 51-76 with a 17-51 record in ACC play, and won only two league road games.

Eight players transferred out during his tenure, and the Demon Deacons have been one of the youngest programs in the country - with only one fourth-year senior in each of the past two years.

Barring any more transfers, Manning will inherit a team with eight players who are either juniors or redshirt juniors - including promising big man Devin Thomas and tempo-setting guard Codi Miller-McIntyre.

As details of Manning's hiring trickled across Twitter, Miller-McIntyre tweeted: "Finally it's over! Time to get back to work."

Manning called the Demon Deacons a "sleeping giant," one that he believes will be able to contend with Tobacco Road rivals Duke and North Carolina in the near future.

"A few years back, they were ranked No. 1 in the country," Manning told AP. "They've had great players. You're about Chris Paul, Tim Duncan, just to name a few, because they've had quite a few.

"I'm looking forward to going there and being part of that great tradition."

Seahawks lock up coach Pete Carroll with extension

SEATTLE (AP) The first major contract extension finalized by the Seattle Seahawks following their Super Bowl title was a commitment to coach Pete Carroll - and to an ideology that finally proved successful at the professional level.

While getting stars such as Earl Thomas and Richard Sherman locked up remains important, the focus for the Seahawks was making sure Carroll was sticking around.

"This was a huge priority for us coming into the offseason," Seattle general manager John Schneider said Friday. "We knew it was around the corner and it was, quite honestly, we're trying to take care of our own people and keep our young players together. But where do you start? You start at the top."

The Seahawks locked up Carroll through the 2016 season with a three-year extension announced Friday. The new contract rips up the final year of the original five-year deal Carroll signed in January 2010, and cleared up any uncertainty whether the 62-year-old coach wanted to stick around after his original deal expired.

Carroll is staying. So are the ideas and beliefs he brought with him when he arrived from Southern California. Back then, there was skepticism whether his style and attitude would work in the NFL.

Now, there's no question.

"Whether this came about or not I was going to keep busting it and going for it. It wasn't going to matter in that regard. But I think the statement, that they wanted to validate the commitment to what we're doing and how we're doing it, was extraordinary," Carroll said. "It was an extraordinary effort on their part and I'm just humbled and thrilled they see it that way."

Carroll is 38-26 in four regular seasons with Seattle and 5-2 in the playoffs. He's the second-oldest head coach in the NFL - yet rarely acts his age - and one of seven current coaches with a Super Bowl title. The championship was a crowning achievement for Carroll after struggles in his two previous stints as an NFL head coach with the New York Jets and New England.

Carroll was lured to Seattle because of something he didn't have in his previous NFL stops: control. Seattle gave him the reins to the franchise, and hired him before adding Schneider to the mix, and creating a relationship that has been marked by stability and success.

After nearly a decade of winning with the Trojans and having say over a program, that level of control was crucial if he was going back to the professional ranks. The Seahawks were willing.

"I loved my time at USC and I was having the time of my life being part of that wonderful school and all the things that we were doing," Carroll said. "But I knew there was another challenge out there and that was coming to the league."

The challenge Carroll inherited included tearing down and rebuilding the Seahawks roster and treading water through a pair of 7-9 seasons his first two years. The breakthrough came in Year 3 when Seattle drafted Russell Wilson, who gave them stability at quarterback. Seattle went 11-5 in Carroll's third season and reached the divisional round of the playoffs.

Carroll followed that by guiding the Seahawks to 13 regular-season wins, the 2013 NFC West title and home-field advantage in the playoffs. Seattle knocked off New Orleans in the divisional round then edged San Francisco in the NFC title game before routing Denver 43-8 in the Super Bowl in February.

Part of the allure for Carroll now is Seattle's potential. The Seahawks are still young and have the likes of Wilson, Sherman, Thomas, Kam Chancellor, Percy Harvin and Michael Bennett, among others, returning from the title team.

"Fortunately we've had a pretty good little run and we're in the middle of something pretty special," Carroll said. "There's no reason that either one of us think, 'OK, we did this one time and that was it and that was our shot.' We think we're right in the middle of a great opportunity here."

Busy mind of Tom Watson, Ryder Cup captain

KANSAS CITY –- So you will ask: What is Tom Watson thinking about as captain of the Ryder Cup team? Tiger’s injury? The emergence of young players like Jordan Spieth and Billy Horschel and others? The United States’ inability to win on European soil since the last time Watson was captain in 1993?

Not really, no.

Clothing. These days, he’s thinking a lot about clothing.

“You’re doing all the stylings and patterns and material and all that,” he says. “And then you have to get it fitted right, make sure everyone is comfortable in it. We’ll have a fitting for as many as 25 players and their caddies at the Memorial. ... We’ll say to them, ‘You have a chance on making the Ryder Cup team, come in and get fitted.' That’s part of the process to get them comfortable in their stuff.”

Well, how the clothes fit might seem like a pretty insignificant detail to many of us, but this is Tom Watson, eight-time major champion, a man who almost won the British Open just months before his 60th birthday. Details are not insignificant. Preparation is not insignificant. He says Jack Nicklaus was better than anyone in golf history at preparing for an event. And that –- not his great talent –- was what made him Jack Nicklaus.

Watson is 64 now -- he just shot his age for the first time -- and he’s a grandfather, and he admits that for the first time last year he saw a significant drop in distance of his drives. He admits that he doesn’t dissect and analyze a golf course the way he once did. He says his game isn’t bad (he just hit one of the most astonishing recovery shots you will ever see) but he says he just isn’t as driven as he used to be.

But anyone who knows Watson does not underestimate the competitive spirit he brings to this job as Ryder Cup captain. That competitive spirit has been the driving force of his golfing life. He came on the Tour as a relative unknown and promised himself only that he would work harder than anyone else. He did that and within a few years was the best golfer in the world.

Though he will downplay his role on the team -– see below -- he has already looked into the inspirational tactics of people like Kansas basketball coach Bill Self. He is slowly getting to know the players -– he is going to play five Tour events this year (Masters, Heritage, Greenbrier, British Open and PGA) and says he will get to know them better.

And as for Tiger Woods –- he says he just hopes Woods recovers from his back surgery and can play the game freely again.

“I’ve been asked a little bit about, ‘What if he doesn’t make the team?’ ” Watson says. “I’ll pick him for the team. I just hope he gets well and starts to play again without pain. That’s all that matters.

“Everybody’s been in pain before, every golfer. For some, it’s ended their careers. For others, they’ve beat it and corrected with surgery. Obviously I hope this is corrected with surgery. Obviously, I hope that he can recover and again swing the club without any pain."

Watson has been critical of Woods in years past -– particularly his behavior on the golf course -– but he says, “We all change.”

Woods was the U.S. Junior Amateur champion the last time that Watson coached the Ryder Cup team ... that was at The Belfry in England, 1993, and the United States needed a last-day comeback that was capped when Davis Love III beat Costantino Rocca on the final hole. Watson has always said that victory is one of the proudest moments of a golf career that included perhaps the most famous shot in golf history (his chip-in at the 1982 U.S. Open at Pebble Beach) and what is almost certainly the most famous duel in golf history (his “Duel in the Sun” matchup with Jack Nicklaus at the 1977 British Open at Turnberry). Bringing the Ryder Cup back to the United States after five losses in the last six matches is very much on his mind.

But when I asked him if he has already started his coaching, he dismissed the question.

“I don’t have to coach,” he said.

“Really? You won’t coach a little bit?”

“No, I don’t have to coach,” he said.

I smiled. I’ve known Tom Watson for more than 20 years. This is a man who once glared at me when I told him that the RBI (Reviving Baseball in the Inner City) team I was sponsoring would beat the one he was sponsoring. He snapped: “We’ll kick your (bleep).” This is the man who started a local tournament in his hometown for local pros called the “Watson Classic” and then pronounced he had no intention of losing it. This is the man who stared down Trevino and Player and Ray Floyd and Seve Ballesteros and, mostly, Jack Nicklaus.

I said, “Wait, so you’re saying that you won’t set a tone? You won’t try to create team chemistry? You’re saying that’s not true at all?”

He kind of looked up sheepishly. “Well, it’s true ... to a certain degree. But that won’t happen until later.”

A's beat Mariners on Crisp's homer in 12th

OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) Coco Crisp homered leading off the bottom of the 12th inning to lift the Oakland Athletics to a 3-2 win over the Seattle Mariners on Thursday night.

Crisp, who scored the tying run with two outs in the eighth inning, hit a towering home run off Seattle reliever Hector Noesi (0-1) on an 0-1 pitch. The ball landed just above the out-of-town scoreboard in right field. It's the sixth game-ending hit of Crisp's career.

Yoenis Cespedes and Sam Fuld also drove in runs for Oakland, which rallied from two runs down for its first walkoff win of the season.

Drew Pomeranz (1-0), the fifth A's pitcher, worked one scoreless inning for the win.

Abraham Almonte had two hits and an RBI for Seattle.

Mavericks beat Clippers 113-107 behind Nowitzki

LOS ANGELES (AP) Dirk Nowitzki scored 26 points, Jose Calderon added 19 and the Dallas Mavericks beat the Los Angeles Clippers for the first time this season, 113-107 on Thursday night.

Blake Griffin had 25 points, 10 rebounds and 11 assists in his first triple-double of the season for the Clippers, who had won 17 of their previous 19, including four straight. They beat the Mavs in their first three meetings of the season, coming from behind each time.

A night earlier, the Clippers came back from a 17-point deficit to beat Phoenix on the road, clinching their second straight Pacific Division title and third consecutive playoff berth.

They nearly pulled it off again.

Trailing by 12 points, Los Angeles scored 10 in a row, including six by Darren Collison, to trail 109-107 with 1:26 left. The Mavericks missed four straight shots and had a turnover before Griffin fouled Nowitzki near mid-court.

Nowitzki made both for a 111-107 lead with 17 seconds left. Collison fouled Shawn Marion and he made both to keep the Clippers down by six.

Samuel Dalembert and Monta Ellis added 12 points each, and Vince Carter had 16 for the Mavs, who won their third straight on a road while battling Memphis for the eighth and last Western Conference playoff spot.

Dallas had the Clippers trailing for much of their last matchup of the season against each other. Los Angeles rallied to tie it 89-all early in the fourth on two free throws by J.J. Redick, who finished with 12 points in his first game since Feb. 3. He missed 25 games with a bulging disk in his back.

Nowitzki led a 10-0 run, sandwiching 3-pointers around a basket by Carter, to put Dallas back in front 99-89.

A 3-pointer by Carter extended the Mavs' lead to 104-93. Dallas clamped down on Chris Paul and Griffin for a stretch before the Clippers got hot. Paul finished with 17 points and nine assists.

DeAndre Jordan added 21 points and 15 rebounds, and Collison had 22 points for the Clippers.

The Clippers rallied to start the third, using a 13-7 run to take a 69-65 lead. Jordan scored six points and four others scored. But their lead was short-lived.

Dallas outscored the Clippers 21-12 to end the third leading 86-81. Calderon scored 10 in a row, Dalembert and Ellis had four each, and Carter and Devin Harris hit 3-pointers to keep the Clippers from regaining the lead.

The Mavericks led by 11 twice in the first half, and were up 58-56 at halftime.

NOTES: Clippers backup G Jamal Crawford missed his third straight game with a sore left Achilles' tendon. F Danny Granger sat out with a strained left hamstring. Coach Doc Rivers said he'd be surprised if either of them return before the playoffs begin in two weeks. ... The Mavs avoided getting swept by the Clippers for the first time since 1993-94. ... It was Griffin's fourth triple-double of his career.

Report: Seahawks reach extension with Carroll

RENTON, Wash. (AP) The Seattle Seahawks have called a news conference for Friday morning amid a report they have reached a contract extension with coach Pete Carroll.

NFL Network reported Thursday night, citing a "source," that Carroll and the Seahawks had reached agreement on a contract extension. Carroll's original five-year deal with Seattle was set to expire after the 2014 season.

The Seahawks announcement did not specify the nature of the news conference and team officials would not confirm the report of an extension for Carroll.

Carroll reached the top of the NFL last season, leading the Seahawks to their first Super Bowl title. Lured away from USC in 2010 with the chance at complete control over the football operations, Carroll tore down then rebuilt the Seahawks roster into one of the best in the NFL. He's 38-26 in four regular seasons with Seattle and 5-2 in the playoffs.

Carroll has made competition the benchmark of his time in Seattle. It's why quarterback Russell Wilson and cornerback Richard Sherman have become stars - because they were given opportunities in Carroll's system.

Carroll, 62, is the second oldest coach in the NFL, but rarely appears his age. He came to Seattle because of the chance he didn't have in his two previous stops as an NFL head coach: control. Seattle gave him the reins to the franchise, and hired him before adding general manager John Schneider to the mix, a relationship that has been marked by stability and success.

Carroll lacked control in his previous positions with New England and the New York Jets. But after a decade of winning with the Trojans and having that control, it was something Carroll demanded if he was going to get back into the professional ranks and the Seahawks were willing.

Seattle also let Carroll imprint his attitude on the locker room. He wanted a fun atmosphere filled with accountability. Competition was at the crux of everything Carroll did from the day he inherited a 5-11 team. Carroll took Seattle to the playoffs in his first season despite a 7-9 regular season record.

The Seahawks plateaued in 2011 going 7-9 again but took a jump in 2012 after drafting Wilson. The Seahawks went 11-5 in the regular season and reached the divisional round of the playoffs. The roster turnover had been completed and there were massive expectations going into 2013.

Seattle matched and surpassed those expectations. Carroll guided Seattle to 13 wins in the regular season, the NFC West title and home-field advantage in the playoffs. Seattle knocked off New Orleans in the divisional round, then edged San Francisco in the NFC title game to reach its second Super Bowl.

At the Super Bowl, Carroll got to celebrate the way he did watching USC's run of dominance in the mid-2000s. Seattle's defense stifled the highest scoring offense in NFL history, humbling Denver in a 43-8 beating to give Seattle its first title. After the season Carroll sounded as if he was locked in to a long future with the Seahawks.

"We're trying to do something really good for a really long time and we want to see how far we can go and someday, we look back and see what we accomplished," Carroll said.

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